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5 Places Where People Live the Longest and Healthiest Lives

5 Blue Zones Where People Live the Longest, Healthiest Lives | Time

5 Blue Zones Where People Live the Longest, Healthiest Lives | Timehttp://time.com/5160475/blue-zones-healthy-long-lives/Global life expectancy averages out to 71.4 years. That means, of course, that some parts of the world see much shorter life spans, while others enjoy far greater longevity. Five places, in particular, fall into the latter category. They’re known as Blue Zones—named for the blue circles researchers drew to identify the first one on a map—and they’re home to some of the oldest and healthiest people in the world. Dan Buettner, author of The Blue Zones and The Blue Zones Solution, told TIME why residents of these places live so long—and how you can steal their habits.

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From the young boy in the backyard to “rattan’s first virtuoso”

From the young boy in the backyard to “rattan’s first virtuoso” | DesignFaves

From the young boy in the backyard to “rattan’s first virtuoso” | DesignFaveshttp://www.designfaves.com/2017/03/from-the-young-boy-in-the-backyard-to-rattans-first-virtuoso#refnlA multi-awarded furniture designer and manufacturer from Cebu, Philippines, Kenneth Cobonpue made a name both in the local and international for his unique designs and roster of clientele that include names such as Queen Sophia of Spain and Brad Pitt.  Cobonpue’s trademark is the integration of locally sourced materials with innovative handmade production processes. His craft is recognized by different award-giving bodies around the globe like the American Society of Interior Design and French Coup de Couer to name a few. His designs have also appeared in films, music videos, and US TV series. In 2007, Kenneth was named by TIME magazine as “rattan’s first virtuoso”. Kenneth was born in a Chinese family and was initially encouraged by his father to take up a business course. But his love for designing was developed at an early age when he used to play with various materials and create furniture pieces at his mother’s backyard factory. Although he followed his father and took up a