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This tech for your aging parents fights isolation, boosts awareness

This tech for your aging parents fights isolation, boosts awareness - CNET

This tech for your aging parents fights isolation, boosts awareness – CNEThttps://www.cnet.com/news/this-tech-for-your-aging-parents-fights-isolation-boosts-awareness/?ftag=CAD1acfa04&bhid=27170905380744054130315685538756At CES 2019, we got a peek at how everything from VR to motion sensors will help older adults stay independent.

Neutrogena’s iPhone ‘SkinScanner’ Analyzes Pores, Moisture, Wrinkles

News: Neutrogena's iPhone 'SkinScanner' Analyzes Pores, Moisture, Wrinkles

News: Neutrogena’s iPhone ‘SkinScanner’ Analyzes Pores, Moisture, Wrinkleshttp://sea.pcmag.com/news/18958/neutrogenas-iphone-skinscanner-analyzes-pores-moisture-wrinkThe device attaches to your iPhone and uses 12 LED lights, sensors, and a 30x magnification lens to analyze the health of your skin.

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Caltech’s ‘lensless camera’ could make our phones truly flat

Caltech’s ‘lensless camera’ could make our phones truly flathttps://www.engadget.com/2017/06/22/caltech-lensless-heterodyne-camera/Cameras need lenses, so your thin phone has a bump, but one day an ultra-thin optical phased array chip could change that. It uses math and optical sensors to simulate the effect of a lens. According to Professor Ali Hajimiri, it “can switch from a fish-eye to a telephoto lens instantaneously—with just a simple adjustment in the way the array receives light.” The principle is similar to the way phased communication arrays can focus and steer radio waves in a particular direction, but working in reverse.

High tech on the high seas: Carnival cruises’ smart makeover

High tech on the high seas: Carnival cruises' smart makeover - CNET

High tech on the high seas: Carnival cruises’ smart makeover – CNEThttps://www.cnet.com/news/carnival-cruises-regal-princess-smart-tech-makeover/?ftag=CAD1acfa04&bhid=27170905380744054130315685538756CNET boards the Regal Princess, essentially a massive floating hive mind with thousands of sensors designed to satisfy your every whim — or at least try.

Future Apple Watch could help treat diabetes with sensors that monitor blood sugar levels

Future Apple Watch could help treat diabetes with sensors that monitor blood sugar levels | TechConnect

Future Apple Watch could help treat diabetes with sensors that monitor blood sugar levels | TechConnecthttp://www.techconnect.com/article/3189950/wearables/future-apple-watch-could-help-treat-diabetes-with-sensors-that-monitor-blood-sugar-levels.html?idg_eid=412374c121fe539738655f52ae490f8f&email_SHA1_lc=f6d5fe2a378ea202f8af35117edcb06be2465c6d&cid=tcon_nlt_techconnect_daily_2017-04-14&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=TechConnect%20Daily%202017-04-14&utm_term=techconnect_dailyA new report claims Apple has a secret team of biomedical engineers working on helping diabetes patients with non-invasive, continuous glucose monitoring.

Roundup: Five 360-Degree Cameras

by Adam Ryder @ popphoto.com

The latest 360-degree cameras are vying for differentiation with tweaks and nifty features at every price point. Most have two lenses and sensors plus software to stitch their output into a spherical image. Some offer weather-sealing and shock absorption, and many take memory cards. A few features once reserved for ultra-high-end cameras, such as stereoscopic 3-D, have made their way into consumer models; 4K video is becoming standard. Here are a few of the newest.

AI that knows you’re sick before you do: IBM’s five-year plan to remake healthcare

by J/o Best @ zdnet.com

A chip that can diagnose a potentially fatal condition faster than the best lab in the country, a camera that can see so deeply into a pill it can tell if its molecular structure has more in common with a real or counterfeit tablet, and a system that can help identify if a patient has a mental illness just from the words they use: IBM is betting that a mix of AI and new hardware can make all three possible within the coming years.

IBM’s research labs are already working on turning these concepts into fully-fledged healthcare tools, combining the company’s existing machine learning and artificial intelligence systems with newer kit including revamped silicon and millimetre wave phased array sensors.

“I Don’t Think We Can Stop It:” The Future of Automation and Job Loss

Last December, Amazon announced its new concept store, Amazon Go. The store is powered by sensors, deep learning artificial intelligence (AI), and computer vision, giving customers the ability to browse through the store, take what they want off shelves, and literally go — no need to queue to pay for the items. The only added step to the shopping experience is swiping the free Amazon Go app from their phones once when they enter the store. Their Amazon account automatically gets charged for their purchases when they leave.

The store concept eliminates labor costs incurred by cashiers and is ideal not only for Amazon, but for customers as well. No lines or checkouts? From a shopper’s point of view, it’s the ideal shopping experience, offering a level of convenience that could be game-changing for the retail industry. However, Amazon Go also raises concerns about potential ramifications on employment and the economy.

“With Amazon, it’s not just about reducing labor costs at all — they’ve come up with something disruptive,” says Martin Ford, author of “Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future,” in an interview at CNBC.

[by June Javelosa @ futurism.com]