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PHOTOS: New Christopher Robin Movie Plush Bring Retro Winnie the Pooh & Friends to Walt Disney World

PHOTOS: New Christopher Robin Movie Plush Bring Retro Winnie the Pooh & Friends to Walt Disney World - WDW News Today

PHOTOS: New Christopher Robin Movie Plush Bring Retro Winnie the Pooh & Friends to Walt Disney World – WDW News Todayhttps://wdwnt.com/2018/07/photos-new-christopher-robin-movie-plush-bring-retro-winnie-the-pooh-friends-to-walt-disney-world/The new live-action Disney movie Christopher Robin hits theaters this August. Disney is getting in on the nostalgia feeling and has released five plush inspired by the upcoming movie. Pooh, Piglet, Eeyore, Tigger, and Kanga & Roo are available.

The digital YASHICA Y35 has all the nuances of an old analog camera without any of the hassles

The digital YASHICA Y35 has all the nuances of an old analog camera without any of the hassles | 9to5Toys

The digital YASHICA Y35 has all the nuances of an old analog camera without any of the hassles | 9to5Toyshttps://9to5toys.com/2017/10/12/the-yashica-y35/If there has been any trend these past few months in tech it’s been this: old can be new again and retro is definitely, definitely in. The same goes for digital photography and the resurgence…

Mint SLR670-S Noir Is a Beautiful Instant Film Camera With a Big Price Tag

by Stan Horaczek @ popphoto.com

by Stan Horaczek @ popphoto.com

The SLR670-S is a classic Polaroid SX-70 camera that has been reborn with an all-black colorway. In addition to the original SX-70 features, it has gotten some enhancements, including tweaked exposure modes. The additional piece offers more precise controls over exposure beyond the simple controls offered by the original.

All that retro goodness comes at a price, though, starting at $679 for the camera on its own. You can add other package options, including accessories that push the price up to a starting point of $765.

An obsession with nostalgia offers us only political poison

by Zoe Williams @ theguardian.com

by Zoe Williams @ theguardian.com

In the 90s, we used to talk a lot about the primacy of the retro, whether or not constantly referring back to the past meant that our innovative spirit was spent.

The passion for an idealised past is very reassuring, culturally; the worst you can throw at it is blandness. Creativity isn’t always successful – if you put a joke that doesn’t work against a piece of nostalgia that does, there is no doubting which is the most affecting. Emotional spaces carved out in childhood exist for ever, and there will always be comfort in their inhabitation.

The paradox of nostalgia is that it has a terrible memory – or rather, like senility, it has a terrible short-term memory and very vivid, utterly inaccurate, recall for the long-ago. Nostalgia is blaming everything on immigrants and multiculturalism, since purity and the past are similar destinations, similarly meaningless, similarly unreachable.