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International Day of Persons with Disabilities

International Day of Persons with Disabilities 3 December

International Day of Persons with Disabilities 3 Decemberhttp://www.un.org/en/events/disabilitiesday/The annual observance of the International Day of Disabled Persons was proclaimed in 1992, by the United Nations General Assembly resolution 47/3. It aims to promote the rights and well-being of persons with disabilities in all spheres of society and development, and to increase awareness of the…

HDMI 2.1 specs and features: Everything you need to know

HDMI 2.1 specs and features: Everything you need to know | TechConnect

HDMI 2.1 specs and features: Everything you need to know | TechConnecthttps://www.techconnect.com/article/3239084/smart-tv/hdmi-21-has-arrived-heres-everything-you-need-to-know.html?idg_eid=412374c121fe539738655f52ae490f8f&email_SHA1_lc=f6d5fe2a378ea202f8af35117edcb06be2465c6d&cid=tcon_nlt_techconnect_daily_2017-12-04Higher resolution audio and video, faster refresh rates, and more bandwidth will enable better experiences with movies, games, VR, and more.

Real life CSI: Google’s new AI system unscrambles pixelated faces

by Alex Hern @ theguardian.com

Google’s neural networks have achieved the dream of CSI viewers everywhere: the company has revealed a new AI system capable of “enhancing” an eight-pixel square image, increasing the resolution 16-fold and effectively restoring lost data.

The neural network could be used to increase the resolution of blurred or pixelated faces, in a way previously thought impossible; a similar system was demonstrated for enhancing images of bedrooms, again creating a 32×32 pixel image from an 8×8 one.

Google’s researchers describe the neural network as “hallucinating” the extra information. The system was trained by being shown innumerable images of faces, so that it learns typical facial features. A second portion of the system, meanwhile, focuses on comparing 8×8 pixel images with all the possible 32×32 pixel images they could be shrunken versions of.

2016 Camera of the Year: Fujifilm X-Pro2

by Miriam Leuchter @ popphoto.com

The X-Pro2, with its 24.3MP APS-C-format X-Trans CMOS III sensor, delivered terrific results in the Popular Photography Test Lab. Resolution at ISO 100 was the highest we’ve seen from an APS-C-sized sensor, and the camera held noise to moderately low up to ISO 800. Factoring in its highly accurate color rendition, we rated overall image quality Excellent up to ISO 400. Capture is pretty fast, too, with a burst speed of 8 frames per second for up to 83 JPEGs, 33 losslessly compressed Raw files, or 27 uncompressed Raw images.

I’ve left Twitter. It is unusable for anyone but trolls, robots and dictators

by Lindy West @ theguardian.com

I deactivated my Twitter account today. It was more of a spontaneous impulse than a New Year resolution, although it does feel like a juice cleanse, a moulting, a polar-bear plunge, a clean slate (except the opposite – like throwing your slate into a volcano and running). One moment I was brains-deep in the usual way, half-heartedly arguing with strangers about whether or not it’s “OK” to suggest to Steve Martin that calling Carrie Fisher a “beautiful creature”who “turned out” to be “witty and bright as well” veered just a hair beyond Fisher’s stated boundaries regarding objectification (if you have opinions on this, don’t tweet me – oh, wait, you can’t); and the next moment the US president-elect was using the selfsame platform to taunt North Korea about the size and tumescence of its nuclear program. And I realised: eh, I’m done. I could be swimming right now. Or flossing. Or digging a big, pointless pit. Anything else.

Don’t Bother With New Year’s Resolutions! Focus on These Instead

article by Thomas Oppong @ medium.com

In 2017, many people will make resolutions again and then immediately break them. Why? Because they won’t do anything different. They don’t have commitment plans. They’re just wishing.

Enthusiasm is common. Commitment is rare.

Studies show that resolutions begin to drop off after a week and only about 40% of those who made resolutions actually stick to their goals. University of Scranton study found out that only 8% of Americans actually follow through and achieve their goals.

Experts say the reason for these failures is that many of us lack the proper structure to support the behavioural changes our new goals require.

Knowing what to do is not an issue, COMMITTING to it is the problem!