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WeBoost Drive Sleek Review: Cellular Signal Booster Helps in Remote Areas

WeBoost Drive Sleek Review: Cellular Signal Booster Helps in Remote Areas - ExtremeTech

WeBoost Drive Sleek Review: Cellular Signal Booster Helps in Remote Areas – ExtremeTechhttps://www.extremetech.com/extreme/260444-weboost-drive-sleek-cellular-signal-booster-helps-remote-areas?utm_source=email&utm_campaign=whatsnewnow&utm_medium=titleHere’s a quick way to step up cellular calling and data quality in your car when you’re off someplace remote, such as in snow country or an out-of-the-way beach down south: Install a cellular phone signal booster. The major player in the market is WeBoost, and its newest phone booster is the Drive Sleek 470135 ($200).

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Sonnet is a device that lets you communicate with your smartphone off-the-grid

Sonnet is a device that lets you communicate with your smartphone off-the-grid | 9to5Toys

Sonnet is a device that lets you communicate with your smartphone off-the-grid | 9to5Toyshttps://9to5toys.com/2017/06/29/sonnet-off-grid-messaging/The Toronto startup has built a smartphone add-on that lets anyone communicate without a cellular signal or wireless networks at all. Sonnet uses long-range radio frequency bandwidth to connect phones over a range of several miles. It essentially turns your phone into a two-way walkie-talkie! It’s all built on existing technology but the Sonnet adds some interesting features.

TMI new RSI • SMS Poetry

The growing use of text messaging on mobile phones could result in an epidemic of repetitive strain injuries dubbed TMI — or Text Message Injury. More from Wired.com’s “Sore Thumb? Talk More, Type Less.”

The winning poem on the UK’s The Guardian reads: “txtin iz messin, mi headn’me englis, try2rite essays, they all come out txtis. gran not plsed w/letters shes getn, swears i wrote better b4 comin2uni. &she’s african” Hetty Hughes won the first prize (£1,000) for this poem from Guardian’s text message poetry competition from almost 7,500 entries. Read the rest at The Guardian’s “The text-message poetry winners.”

SMS/Text messaging contest

The Guardian newspaper said Thursday it would offer a 1,000 pound ($1,440) prize to aspiring “tele-poets” who were bound by only one literary rule — no entry may exceed 160 characters, the maximum possible length of a single text message. From the Yahoo!News article, “2b or Not 2b — Prize 4 Txt Mssg Shakespeare.”

Visor Edge • Disposable cellphones update

PDABuzz.com offers a sneak peek on a new Handspring Visor “Edge” PDA for release this spring (April/May). It’s thinner, sleeker, and reminds you a lot about Apple’s TiBook. The new device will have an all metal case, PalmOS 3.5, 8MB RAM, a lithium (ion or polymer are uncertain) battery, a detachable Springboard adaptor, and it will be the lightest & thinnest Visor yet. A reader notes that the Edge, like other Handsprings, does not come with PalmOS 4.0 nor is the OS upgradable. That instantly gives the Palm m500 the upper hand. Updated info from Go2Mac’s Visor Edge Details. • Dave Wilson of LATimes.com had his hands on a working prototype of the much-awaited paper cellphone in this article: New Origami Trick: Turn Paper Into a Functional Phone.

New Sega Robots • Another MS Outlook flaw

Sega unveils humanoid robots, capable of laughing, loving and crying. The family includes C-BOT which communicates via a digital display face on its head and by a cell phone. Other members are Y-BOT, which is touted as the robot that can talk back and learn words, and M-BOT, which is expected to dance along with music. Another robot, however, Robo-chi, can’t walk because it’s a baby. • Those little virtual business cards that some people attach to their e-mails might be dangerous. Microsoft announced Friday that a flaw in its Outlook e-mail program allows crackers to crash or remotely control computers and entire networks, via virtual business cards (Vcards) that harbor malicious code.

Top 25 in 2001 • Text messaging

Interactive Week presents 25 of the mavens and mavericks we expect will make 2001 a year to remember in this ZDNet article, “Top 25 People To Watch In 2001.” • Howard Gutowitz has unleashed a program he claims can accurately predict words as they are being typed on a cell phone keypad, even after just one digit is struck. Just when us Filipinos have mastered cellphone shorthand, and some of us even heralded the advent of T9 for even more expressive and articulate text messaging (Erap jokes and ASCII-art messages aside), here comes another blessing! Read more on ZDNet’s article, “A better way to type on your cell phone?

Disposable cellphones update

From Slashdot: The Register has an article $10 paper mobile phone to launch this year which describes a disposable device by Randice-Lisa Altschu called the Phone-Card-Phone, the thickness of three credit cards and made from recycled paper products. It comes with 60 minutes of calling time and a hands-free attachment. More information on the inventor’s web site: Dieceland.