The Radical Origins of Christianity | The New Yorker

The Radical Origins of Christianity | The New Yorkerhttp://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/07/10/the-radical-origins-of-christianity?mbid=nl_170707_Daily&CNDID=50268964&spMailingID=11427205&spUserID=MjA0NTE2Mjc4MjE5S0&spJobID=1200606514&spReportId=MTIwMDYwNjUxNAS2Emmanuel Carrère’s “The Kingdom” explores how a tiny sect became a global religion. An amazingly various book, it narrates the author’s crises of religious faith in the nineteen-nineties; combines conventional history and speculative reconstruction to describe the rise of early Christianity; deftly animates the first-century lives and journeys of Paul, Luke, and John; and attempts to explain how an unlikely cult, formed around the death and resurrection of an ascetic lyrical revolutionary, grew into the established Church we know today. “Can one believe that such things are still believed?” Nietzsche asked, scornfully. “And yet they are still believed,” Carrère replies.